Are Multiple Job Offers Making Decisions Tougher?

Are Multiple Job Offers Making Decisions Tougher?


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by Namratha


Owning the freedom to pick a job from two different offers is often difficult, rather than an easy task. It is lovely to have the option until you’ve to make a final call. No matter how great your final pick sounds, you might always feel like you’re losing out on the declined offer in some way or the other.

We live in the age where all our decisions are ruled and majorly defined by the information available on the internet. We actually trust Google more than our own peers today. With all the companies and recruitment agencies having their details on their website along with the ability to apply for jobs with the click of a button, people are able to apply for multiple roles at one go. This often leads to multiple interviews and leaves you deciding between job offers.  

One of the biggest drivers for anyone while finalising an offer is usually dictated by the pay-cheque. This should never be the sole factor contributing to your decision-making process. You always need to ask questions. You tend to cover all the generic ones in the process of your interview, but that is never enough. One way is to ask people around you or known associates of the organisations, so that you are able to broaden your horizons and open your eyes about areas you haven’t even taken into consideration.

Company transparency is a good indicator to better understand if this is your calling. You want to work in an environment where you’re always well informed and kept up-to-date. While making a comparison between two offers you should be evaluating factors that actually have an influence on your life. A company could offer you a great deal of perks and benefits, but if they are not actually adding value to you personally, they are just glorified words. For example, for people with children, working remotely would be a factor that could make them lean towards one job over the alternative. But, for others it could be availability to upskill every so often to ensure career progression in the long term. You should always step back and look at the bigger picture and the long term goals you have and not just focus on the immediate wins you can receive by choosing to work in a company. See what the company can do for you, the fact that you have an offer in front of you implies that the company knows what you can do for them, they aware of your potential. Now it’s your turn to understand if the company’s goals aligned with yours.

Our Director Michael Lantry broke it down and describes all the factors that you should not overlook while making a decision and explains how it’s important to visualise yourself in the role and the company. He details how it is key to picture your daily life at the workplace and how your engagement would be with the team, which he says can only be achieved through asking questions. He recommends a small exercise that will ease the confusion in your mind and which will lead to making an informed decision:

  • Always gain clarity on what kind of positive challenges you could expect during your term in the organisation which can ensure consistent development of your skills and knowledge.
  • The salaries and benefits will always be a key decision making factor. But, as we mentioned earlier, judge if these benefits are relevant to you and not just glorified words.
  • At first glance you might overlook it, but travel and commute has a major influence on your work satisfaction. This directly influences your work-life balance and should be on your list of key factors of comparison.
  • Dive into the company and its products and research if that’s something that aligns with your interests. You shouldn’t ever step into something half-hearted, this will define the next few years of your life, it should be something that captures your interest.

Finally he emphasis the need to be selfish regarding the decision. Focus on your career and your personal life and be brutally honest with yourself, it’s a job you’ll be at for a substantial period, 7 days a week and 8 hours a day. Make sure its an environment you can see yourself growing and blooming in.



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